Showing posts with label linux. Show all posts
Showing posts with label linux. Show all posts

Tuesday, 2 April 2013

Step By Step Turbo C++ IDE In Ubuntu 12.04

Well we are doing our labs based on the traditional Turbo C++ IDE and I decided to write this blog post with the information on how I installed it on my Ubuntu box.

First thing first, download Turbo C from internet. For your ease, I've uploaded it HERE.

We will have to install dosbox to run the windows dos mode applications so lets install it:

samar@samar-Techgaun:~$ sudo apt-get install dosbox


Once you install dosbox, unzip the content to somewhere in your $HOME directory. In my example, I unzipped the content of the Turbo C zip file into ~/Tools/TurboC3/. Now launch the dosbox by typing dosbox in the terminal. A dosbox emulation window will appear which will look like your old DOS system.

In the window, type the following (make sure you type appropriate path for your installation):

mount C: ~/Tools/
C:
cd TurboC3
INSTALL.EXE


And, then follow the on-screen information. Refer to the screenshots below:















Once the installation finishes, you can then run the Turbo C by mounting the drive again and then navigation to C:\TC (cd C:\TC\BIN). If you need to use the Turbo C++ IDE frequently, my suggestion would be to add an autoexec entry in your dosbox configuration. The default configuration file resides in ~/.dosbox/dosbox-0.74.conf (My version of dosbox is 0.74 hence the file name, by default). Open up this file and in the section of [autoexec], add the lines below:

[autoexec]
mount C: ~/Tools/
C:
cd TC\BIN
TC.EXE


Adding this entry will run the above commands during the startup of dosbox thus giving you the Turbo C IDE interface directly on running dosbox.

I hope this helps :)


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Saturday, 9 March 2013

Check Battery Status From Terminal [How To]

Since I had no graphical interface for some reason, I needed some alternative way to check the battery status. If your system includes acpi command, you can just use this command but I had no luxury of such command and here's how you can do the same thing I did. The /proc/ virtual file system has information of different states among which the ACPI information is one. The ACPI information provides us the details of device configurations and power status of the system. Below is one flavor of the command to check the battery status:

samar@Techgaun:~$ cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT0/state
present: yes
capacity state: ok
charging state: charged
present rate: unknown
remaining capacity: unknown
present voltage: 12276 mV

samar@Techgaun:~$ cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT0/info
present: yes
design capacity: 4400 mAh
last full capacity: unknown
battery technology: rechargeable
design voltage: 10800 mV
design capacity warning: 250 mAh
design capacity low: 150 mAh
cycle count: 0
capacity granularity 1: 10 mAh
capacity granularity 2: 25 mAh
model number: Primary
serial number:
battery type: LION
OEM info: Hewlett-Packard


The first command provides the general status of the battery and the second command provides the detailed information about battery. The other way is to use the upower command that talks with the upowerd daemon. Upowerd daemon is a default daemon in ubuntu and few others for power statistics. Below is the command to see battery details:

samar@Techgaun:~$ upower -i /org/freedesktop/UPower/devices/battery_BAT0
native-path: /sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00/LNXSYBUS:00/PNP0C0A:00/power_supply/BAT0
vendor: Hewlett-Packard
model: Primary
power supply: yes
updated: Sat Mar 9 10:12:17 2013 (5 seconds ago)
has history: yes
has statistics: yes
battery
present: yes
rechargeable: yes
state: empty
energy: 0 Wh
energy-empty: 0 Wh
energy-full: 47.52 Wh
energy-full-design: 47.52 Wh
energy-rate: 0 W
voltage: 12.28 V
percentage: 0%
capacity: 100%
technology: lithium-ion


If you wish to install acpi for future uses, you can do so by typing the command below:

samar@Techgaun:~$ sudo apt-get install acpi


Play around with different switches by looking over the help and man pages. You will find this tool quite useful :)


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Tuesday, 12 February 2013

Chaining The Proxies With ProxyChains

In this tutorial, we will learn to redirect our TCP traffics through the chain of proxies using a well known tool named ProxyChains.

ProxyChains is a tool for tunneling TCP and DNS traffics through chain of several proxy servers which supports HTTP, SOCKS4, and SOCKS5 proxy servers. Hence, this tool leverages several usages such as anonymity, bypassing filters, running any program through proxy servers, etc.

You can DOWNLOAD proxychains from SourceForge. In ubuntu, you can directly install it from repos:

samar@samar-Techgaun:~$ sudo apt-get install proxychains


Once you have installed the proxychains, you need to configure this tool. The global configuration file is located at /etc/proxychains.conf so if you wish to have your own configuration file, you could either create the proxychains.conf file in the current working directory or at $HOME/.proxychains/proxychains.conf.

In my example, I'll edit the global configuration file by issuing the command:

samar@samar-Techgaun:~$ sudo nano /etc/proxychains.conf


First, we will have to select the kind of chaining option we want to use. We can use one of the dynamic_chain, strict_chain, and random_chain chaining options. In most cases, it is good to just use the dynamic_chain so we uncomment the line containing dynamic_chain and comment all other chaining options.



Then we need to grab some proxies and then insert at the end of our configuration file which would look like:

socks4 127.0.0.1 9050
socks5 192.168.2.90 3128
socks5 1**.1**.*.* 8080


You could add as much as proxy servers in the list. Btw, the asterisks in the above example do not mean wildcards, they are just there to symbolize some proxy server. There are free sites on the Internet which provide big database of different kinds of proxies. Even several proxy scrapers are available all over the internet and you could even write one on your own. So getting list of good proxies is not the difficult job. Once you finish the configuration, you can run any command through proxychains. The syntax is as simple as below:

samar@samar-Techgaun:~$ proxychains <any_command>


For example, below is the example nmap scan run through the proxychains:

samar@samar-Techgaun:~$ proxychains nmap -p 1-1000 -O victim.tld


P.S. If you are interested in some GUI for using proxychains, you can use ProxyChainsGUI. Lastly, the default package from Ubuntu repository seems to be missing the proxyresolv command so I would recommend to compile the source code locally.

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Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Search Text Over Multiple PDF Files In Linux

You can use the old grep command or the small script using the pdftotext command to search text over multiple pdf files but we are talking about a simple utility that lets us to search text in PDF files.

The pdfgrep tool lets you perform grep style search over multiple pdf files easily from the terminal. It depends upon the poppler package and under ubuntu, you can just type the command below to install pdfgrep.

samar@\Techgaun:~$ sudo apt-get install pdfgrep


Once pdfgrep is installed, you can perform any kind of search like you would do while using the grep command. Enjoy grepping the PDF files :)


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Tuesday, 29 January 2013

Swasthani.com Swasthani Ripper

Yesterday I came to know that I can listen Swasthani online at this site, www.swasthani.com and I decided to write a swasthani audio downloader. Since it would be useful for everyone, here is the script.

From the site itself, Sri Swasthani Brata Katha is a very popular ritual observed in Nepal in the Poush month (January – February) during winter. Goddess Sri Swasthani, known to grant wishes of her devotees, is worshipped for the whole month of Poush. The Swasthani Brat Katha (story) is recited everyday. The month long telling of the tales are dedicated to the Goddess and the stories that are mainly narrated are those of Swasthani Devi, Lord Shiva and other Gods.

#!/bin/bash
###############################################
# Swasthani.com Swasthani Ripper       #
# Samar @ http://www.techgaun.com       #
###############################################
if [[ ! -f /tmp/swasthani.txt ]]
then
 wget http://www.swasthani.com/ -O - | egrep '<li class="leaf( first| last)?"><a href="/swasthani/' | grep -o '<a .*href=.*>' | sed -e 's/<a /\n<a /g' | sed -e 's/<a .*href=['"'"'"]//' -e 's/["'"'"'].*$//' -e '/^$/ d' > /tmp/swasthani.txt
fi

while read -r line
do
 wget "http://www.swasthani.com$line" -O - | egrep 'data="soundFile=http://www.swasthani.com/system/files/' | cut -d\" -f6 | cut -d= -f2 | wget -nc -i -
done </tmp/swasthani.txt


Save the above file as swasthani, then chmod for executable permission and run it. If you have problem copying above code, you can check the Swasthani Downloader at GitHub. Enjoy listening Swasthani, geeks :)


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How To Check Which Groups You Belong To

In this post, you will get to know about a simple command that lets you know what groups the particular user belongs to. Users and groups are the one of the several concepts employed in the Linux systems for access control.

From the man page, the groups command does is:
Print group memberships for each USERNAME or, if no USERNAME is specified, for the current process (which may differ if the groups database has changed).

So if you are interested in finding what group a particular user is in, run the command as below. Replace samar with your USERNAME and you are good to go:

samar@Techgaun:~$ groups samar

samar : samar adm cdrom sudo vboxusers ....


I hope this proves useful :)


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Thursday, 10 January 2013

Create Backup Of List Of Apps Installed In Ubuntu

When my laptop's HDD was near to death, I had created backup of the list of all applications and packages I'd installed in my Ubuntu so that I would be able to install them easily in my new system in new HDD. I had forgotten about it but today suddenly remembered and am sharing this simple technique. Fire up the terminal and type the following:

samar@Techgaun:~$ sudo dpkg --get-selections > installed_apps




Now the list of packages will be saved in the installed_apps file and you can use it for future reference. I hope this is useful ;)


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Monday, 17 December 2012

Evince Rocks! Foxit Sucks

Been using foxit PDF reader for a while in Windows 7 while I was working on some windows-based project and I was totally pissed off with foxit.

Not being a fan of Adobe's PDF reader, I decided to try foxit PDF reader since some of the online reviews were stating Foxit to be a great PDF reader. Basically, I was looking for a very simple, fast, and lightweight PDF reader that suits me. Foxit has everything a good PDF reader should have. It works pretty well with any PDF documents I need to read. It is supposedly lightweight, fast, secure, and it has millions of users. But, it was neither fast nor lightweight in its default configuration, in my experience.

But its still lacking some feature, that I do not know. I just can not feel the software. I am not satisfied with the level of user experience this software imparts. What do you guys have to say about this??

Then I decided to use the famous PDF reader from linux world, the Evince. And, what can I say?

Evince ROCKS!!!





If you have not tried evince for windows, download it from Gnome's Evince page and try right away on Windows. It should work on Windows XP, Vista, and 7.

Download Evince




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